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NASA’s Artemis II Crew Meets Their Moon-bound Vehicle

Monday was a memorable day for the three Americans and one Canadian who will travel on NASA’s Artemis II circumlunar mission as it was their first opportunity to see the Orion spacecraft that will take them around the Moon and back to Earth.

The Orion crew capsule for the Artemis II mission, which is now fully finished and undergoing some final testing before being joined to its power and propulsion module at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, gave the astronauts the chance to look through the hatch.

Right now, the massive Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Building at Kennedy is home to the 16.5-foot-diameter (5-meter) Orion crew module, which is about 4 feet wider than the Apollo command module from the first age of lunar exploration. The Orion capsule is surrounded on three sides by a tower of powerful speakers.

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NASA’s Orion Module Test: Implications for Artemis II Launch

Nasa’s-artemis-ii-crew-meets-their-moon-bound-vehicle
The Orion crew capsule for the Artemis II mission, which is now fully finished and undergoing some final testing before being joined to its power and propulsion module at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, gave the astronauts the chance to look through the hatch.

The Orion crew module will begin to hear noises that simulate the acoustic energy from a rocket launch later this week. The purpose of the direct field acoustic test is to make sure the Artemis II crew’s spaceship can withstand the loud noise produced by the Space Launch System rocket’s engines and boosters.

According to Jim Free, the head of the NASA division in charge of creating the hardware for the Artemis lunar program, the preparation of the crew module component of the Artemis II mission—where the astronauts will reside during their roughly 10-day loop flight around the far side of the Moon—is now dictating the launch date.

The preparations are falling behind schedule by a few weeks, which NASA needs to keep the planned Artemis II launch in late November 2024. That obviously suggests that a delay till 2025 is likely.

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Source: arstechnica.com

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