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Russia-raises-black-sea-military-tensions-after-grain-deal-collapse

Russia Raises Black Sea Military Tensions After Grain Deal Collapse

On Wednesday, the Russian defense ministry issued a warning that any ships heading to Ukrainian ports around the Black Sea would be treated as military tensions.

Moscow is increasing its threats against Ukrainian Black Sea ports and the ships that dock there, raising the possibility of confrontation along the vital trade route and drastically increasing the price of wheat worldwide.

All ships traveling across the Black Sea to Ukrainian ports, the Russian defense ministry warned in a statement on Wednesday, will be suspected of transporting military equipment. 

The countries of such warships will be regarded as supporting the Kiev regime in the Ukrainian conflict, the statement continued.

According to Adam Hodge, a spokeswoman for the White House National Security Council, the US also has evidence indicating that Russia has increased the number of sea mines around Ukrainian ports and may strike commercial ships in the area.

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Implications of Russian Actions to Ukrainian President

Russia-raises-black-sea-military-tensions-after-grain-deal-collapse
On Wednesday, the Russian defense ministry issued a warning that any ships heading to Ukrainian ports around the Black Sea would be treated as military tensions.

The actions appeared to be in response to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s declaration that his nation will continue to ship grain through the Odesa port even after Russia withdrew from the one-year-old deal relieving its military blockade of Ukraine’s Black Sea ports on Monday. 

It is likely to halt future grain shipments from the major seaports of Ukraine, one of the largest exporters of wheat, and temporarily disrupt grain markets as it follows a second night of Russian bombing at the Odesa port.

Since the grain deal was mediated by Turkey and the UN last summer, major international shipping firms, including the US-based agricultural shipping giant Cargill, have shipped wheat, corn, sunflower oil, and other staple foods through a humanitarian corridor to an inspection facility in Istanbul before they were distributed to international markets. 

Those supplies have occasionally been stopped by threats from Russia, which is also a significant exporter of wheat, but only for a short period of time.

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Source: www.politico.com

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